Seizure Disorders

There are two types of disorders that determine seizure. The first one is called partial seizure, and the second one is called generalized seizure. What’s the difference between the two?

In partial seizure, the abnormality starts in one area of the brain. In time, that abnormality can spread to the other areas of the brain. The symptoms of partial seizures are:

  • Loss of consciousness
  • Changes in your senses
  • Slight dizziness
  • Changes in your vision
  • Twitching of the muscle

In a generalized seizure, the abnormality can start from multiple parts of the brain. The abnormality then, spreads quickly. A lot of times, when the problem is diagnosed, the abnormality has spread already to the many areas of the brain. This makes generalized seizure, hard to treat. Some of its symptoms are:

  • Daydream like episodes
  • Muscle twitching especially in the arms and legs
  • Seizures that go as long as 20 minutes

Psychosocial Aspects of Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that knows no bounds. Epilepsy knows no difference about cultural background, age, gender, and more. Do you now that in every 100 individuals, one is diagnosed with epilepsy (National Academy of Neuropsychology Foundation, N.D)? Most of these epileptic patients are diagnosed either, at a young or old age. 

Epilepsy is a disorder that you would not want to have. However, most people can live a normal life despite having it. This can be achieved through proper treatment, early diagnosis, and social acceptance. In some countries and states, civilians are still getting the hang of socially accepting people diagnosed with epilepsy.

Epilepsy is still considered “a problem” for a person who wants to get a job. Epilepsy is also thought of as something that gets in the way of marriage, education, economic status and more. In return, epileptic patients are more distressed about the thought of not being socially accepted than the actual physical problem itself.

Cannabis oil extract

Cannabis oil extract comes from the Sativa plant. It can either have the combination of both THC and CBD. Sometimes, cannabis oil has only CBD in it. Cannabis oil is one of the most concentrated forms amongst cannabis products and for this reason, it is said to be the most potent form.

High-Quality cannabis oil can be used for medicinal purposes. It can treat different conditions like sclerosis, epilepsy, arthritis, adrenal disease, respiratory problems, skin problems, gout, cancer, diabetes, and more. 

Tolerance rate of children and adults (so gradual dose increase in this point)

Patients will most likely not develop a resistance to CBD Oil. Many assumed that CBD oil can become a drug to which humans might resist in the long run. However, a study shows that it’s possible that most patients will not develop a resistance to CBD (the University of Alabama at Birmingham, 2018).

In a study, about a third of the epileptic subjects developed resistance to CBD (Bazil, 2003). The rest of the subjects didn’t develop a resistance for it on a long-term basis. It’s disappointing that CBD can still be a resistant drug, however, it’s a hopeful sign that most of the subjects didn’t develop a resistance to it. The study’s recommendation for those that developed resistance is to increase their CBD dosage gradually.

Final Thought

CBD oil is something that the medical world is interested in, due to its low chance of being a resistant drug. In addition to that, it’s something that is natural compared to its synthetic counterpart. Try one now, and this might be your new natural alternative for epilepsy.

 

References:

1) National Academy of Neuropsychology Foundation. (N.D) What is Epilepsy? Available at:
https://nanfoundation.org/neurologic-disorders/epilepsy/what-is-epilepsy

2) University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2018) CBD oil study shows significant improvement in patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Available at:
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-cbd-oil-significant-patients-treatment-resistant.html

3) Bazil, Carl. (2003) Drug Resistant Epilepsy: A Compliance Problem or an abnormality of Transport Proteins? Available at:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC321224/